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I think I am losing it! Blog Writer's Block

I was daydreaming today in class and I came up with the best idea for a blog posting.  Unfortunately, I completely lost my train of thought and can't remember what I was even thinking about.  I have been so frustrated trying to realign my thoughts so I could pick up the lead, but alas the only thing I can remember is that I needed to get some clip art showing pictures of someone donating blood.  I can't explain it, and have no idea what it means, except that I am getting a little older and a little bit dumber.

Interestingly enough, earlier in the morning, I made a request online with my local library to hold the movie DVD for Finding Forrester for me to pickup.  I made a detour on the way home to get it so my wife and kids could enjoy it with me.  It is certainly one of my favorite movies for several reasons: 1) It stars Sean Connery, who clearly is an excellent and my favorite actor; by far the best ever James Bond, 2) The William Forrester character strongly parallels the life of J.D. Salinger, author of one of my favorite books Catcher in the Rye, and 3) it is actually rated PG, so my kids could watch it without skipping parts, which is incredibly rare these days with sexual overtones and violence infecting so many "family films".

In the movie, William Forrester (Connery) is helping a young teen develop his writing to the next level and beyond.  In a key scene, they are typing on Underwood typewriters facing each other.  Forrester is typing away, without even looking at the paper or the keys (which is odd because he index finger pecks the keys . . never mind) and explains to Jamal that a writer simply writes the first draft from the heart, and edits subsequent drafts from the head. 


I honestly thought that watching the movie for the 50th time would jog the great idea that I had launched earlier in the day while at school, but, no dice.  Instead I am still trying to find the path I lost, by typing this blog entry, and still having no luck whatsoever.  Anyway, I am still writing, and that is what's important.  If you are still reading, then I thank you just the same.  Maybe I need to watch The Hunt for Red October for the 200th time (another Connery classic). You can never get enough "Verify distansche to target Vashili (Vasili), one ping only" or "Be careful what you shoot at Ryan, thingshz in here don't react to well to bulletsch".  Even as a Russky, always the Scotsman.  Enough diversions, I need to get back to work.

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